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dc.contributor.authorSommervoll, Dag Einar
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-07T08:44:16Z
dc.date.available2013-10-01T23:00:23Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1617-7134 (e-utg)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/93930
dc.descriptionThe final publication is available at www.springerlink.comno_NO
dc.description.abstractPeople have a tendency to procrastinate when faced with aversive tasks - but they also procrastinate in relation to beneficial matters whose rewards are instantaneous. If agents value present anticipations of future consumption, revision of consumption plans may be viewed as a benign form of self-deception. We consider a minimal generalization of the Samuelson discounted utility model to allow for utility linked to next period consumption. Agents are assumed to vary with respect to their sophistication. In this context, commitment and self-control are obstacles to the pursuit of increased utility. We also examine different environments that are likely to facilitate repeated revisions.no_NO
dc.language.isoengno_NO
dc.publisherSpringerno_NO
dc.subjectIntertemporal choiceno_NO
dc.subjectself-deceptionno_NO
dc.subjecttime inconsistencyno_NO
dc.subjectnaiveteno_NO
dc.subjectself-controlno_NO
dc.subjectdiscounted utility functionsno_NO
dc.subjectanticipationno_NO
dc.subjectmemoryno_NO
dc.titleSweet self-deceptionno_NO
dc.typeJournal articleno_NO
dc.typePeer reviewedno_NO
dc.source.pagenumber73-88no_NO
dc.source.volume109no_NO
dc.source.journalJournal of Economicsno_NO
dc.source.issue1no_NO
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00712-012-0308-2


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