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dc.contributor.authorOlson, Erik L.
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-09T07:30:45Z
dc.date.available2013-05-30T23:00:19Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1552-7824 (e-utg)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/93894
dc.descriptionThe final publication is available at www.springerlink.comno_NO
dc.description.abstractDespite widespread pro-green attitudes, consumers frequently purchase non-green alternatives. One possible explanation for this value–action gap is the tradeoffs that green products often force on their users: higher prices, lower quality, and/or reduced performance. The current study uses conjoint analysis to uncover the attribute preferences of car and TV buyers when green attributes are negatively correlated with conventional attributes. These attribute preferences are then used to predict choice among sets of green and less green alternatives currently sold in the marketplace. Strong preferences for green products are found when tradeoffs are not apparent, but preference shifts significantly to less green compromise alternatives when the actual attribute tradeoffs are considered. Although general preference is reduced by tradeoffs, a green product offering some compensatory advantage on a conventional attribute does attract a broader spectrum of consumers, while only “dark green” consumers are willing to pay the price to go green when the product offers few compensatory qualities. In all cases, however, predicted buyers of the greenest technologies offset some of their environmental benefits by choosing more energy-thirsty specifications on negatively correlated conventional attributes. Managerial and public policy implications of the findings are then discussedno_NO
dc.language.isoengno_NO
dc.publisherSpringerno_NO
dc.subjectvalue-action gapno_NO
dc.subjectnegative attribute correlationsno_NO
dc.subjectgreen product adoptionno_NO
dc.subjectsustainabilityno_NO
dc.subjectrebound effectsno_NO
dc.titleIt`s not easy being green: the effects of attribute tradeoffs on green product preference and choiceno_NO
dc.typeJournal articleno_NO
dc.typePeer reviewedno_NO
dc.source.pagenumber171-184no_NO
dc.source.volume41no_NO
dc.source.journalJournal of the Academy of Marketing Scienceno_NO
dc.source.issue2no_NO
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11747-012-0305-6


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