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dc.contributor.authorJahre, Marianne
dc.contributor.authorDumoulin, Luc
dc.contributor.authorGreenhalgh, Langdon B.
dc.contributor.authorHudspeth, Claudia
dc.contributor.authorLimlim, Phillips
dc.contributor.authorSpindler, Anna
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-22T10:38:30Z
dc.date.available2012-05-22T10:38:30Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn2042-6747 (e-utg)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/93502
dc.descriptionThis is the authors’ final, accepted and refereed manuscript to the articleno_NO
dc.description.abstractPurpose of this paper Uganda is one of many African countries struggling to develop adequate healthcare, particularly in regard to local treatment and access to drugs. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of how reducing supply-chain complexity can improve health in developing countries. Design/methodology/approach This study and evaluation included 50 interviews and 27 site visits of the public healthcare system in Karamoja, northeast Uganda. A mapping of drug-supply chains was undertaken to identify causes of stock shortages and possible solutions. A model for logistics process redesign was used for the analysis. Results were quantified with use of a simple tool developed for this specific purpose. Findings The main conclusion is that less supply-chain complexity can produce higher customer service in terms of less stock shortages, while keeping costs down. By reducing lead times and uncertainty, increasing order frequencies, and moving order points and safety stocks, there may be better integration between information and goods flows and bottlenecks in the supply chain may be reduced. Research limitations/implications While the empirical study is extensive, there are uncertainties in the data that must be taken into account. The effects of the suggested solutions remain to be analyzed and documented upon implementation. Practical implications The study was rooted in a practical problem and provides practical solutions for developing countries and agencies providing aid. Social implications Stock shortages of life-saving drugs are a general problem in countries with lack of financial and technical infrastructure. Improvements will impact the lives of many people. Value of the paper The paper provides an understanding of the applicability of traditional logistics principles in a new context. It provides the academic community with a much-needed in-depth understanding of humanitarian logistics. The approach can be used in other studiesno_NO
dc.language.isoengno_NO
dc.publisherEmeraldno_NO
dc.subjectdrugno_NO
dc.subjectsupply chainno_NO
dc.subjecthealthno_NO
dc.subjectAfricano_NO
dc.subjectdevelopmentno_NO
dc.subjectstock shortagesno_NO
dc.titleImproving health in developing countries: reducing complexity of drug supply chainsno_NO
dc.typeJournal articleno_NO
dc.typePeer reviewedno_NO
dc.source.pagenumber54-84no_NO
dc.source.volume2no_NO
dc.source.journalJournal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Managementno_NO
dc.source.issue1no_NO
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1108/20426741211226000


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