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dc.contributor.authorFaucheur, Sarah Le
dc.contributor.authorChabret, Antoine
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-18T10:23:49Z
dc.date.available2018-12-18T10:23:49Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2578057
dc.descriptionMasteroppgave(MSc) in Master of Science in Business, Marketing - Handelshøyskolen BI, 2018nb_NO
dc.description.abstractOur Master thesis tests the impact of consistency and inconsistency between a self-declared claim1 and a mandatory fact information label2 on a same product packaging on the consumer pre-purchase behaviour in terms of attitude, purchase intention and memory. The empirical testing introduces a controlled experimental approach regarding the level of sensitivity and knowledge of the consumer about nutritional and environmental issues and labels. After having collected 180 answers from an online survey, results show that consistency between a self-declared claim and a mandatory fact information label leads to more favourable attitude and higher purchase intention towards the product than inconsistency. However, to contrast with attitude and purchase intention, memory is rather enhanced by inconsistency that is likely to lead to a longer and deeper information process among consumers. More specifically, some moderators like sensitivity and knowledge are found to enhance the impact of consistency and inconsistency. Indeed, the relationship between a sel-declared claim and a mandatory fact information label does not have the same impact whether consumers are highly sensitive or highly knowledgeable about environmental and nutritional issues and labels. Consequently, while consistent placements appear natural, inconsistent ones adversely affect brand attitude and purchase intention because they seem out of place and are discounted, but promotes brand recall and recognition, forcing consumers to spend more time on looking at the packaging elements, and in particular the brand name. However, the results of the change in the different variables of the consumer pre-purchase behaviour between highly sensitive/knowledgeable and the low sensitive/knowledgeable. At the end, it is helpful to understand how consumers process different sources of information on a same product packaging. In the light of the willingness to inform consumers about their own consumption, this study shows that it is necessary to sensitize and educate consumers to render all governmental projects effective because it moderates the level of amount of information processed. Beyond the need of clarity and education, brands and companies really must pay attention to their communication strategy. Consumers are really receptive to displayed information on package and can shift their attitude and purchase intention regarding what they find on the packaging, particularly if the self-declared claim and the mandatory fact information label are consistent or not.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherHandelshøyskolen BInb_NO
dc.subjectmarkedsføringnb_NO
dc.subjectmarketingnb_NO
dc.titleThe impact of consistency and inconsistency between a selfdeclared claim and a mandatory fact information label on a packaging on the consumer pre-purchase behaviournb_NO
dc.typeMaster thesisnb_NO


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